2011 Jays Draft Impressions

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After the dust has settled, here are a few of my impressions from the Jays 2011 MLB Draft.

From a personal standpoint, I don’t feel there’s too much I can learn from a kids Edison, California high school stats. As with most seasons, I read the pluses & minuses of the top picks, scouts takes on tools and the occasional make-up characteristics. My personal preference leans towards toolsy arms, power bats and avoiding lower ceiling but quicker to the show college pitchers.

Note: For scouting reports I’d recommend checking out Baseball America’s Jays Draft scouting report rundown, which should open in a new window:

http://www.baseballamerica.com/draftdb/2011team.php?team=1022

I should learn to scroll

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When the Jays initially drafted Tyler Beede I quickly scanned Baseball Prospectus’ Mock Draft, which didn’t contain Beede in their first 33 picks. Based upon this, I assumed Tyler was an Aaron Sanchez style cost savings pick. Had I read further down the page I would have realized that he was a classic over-slot value play.

Whether the Jays can get a deal done with Beede (and others such as Comer & Anderson) remains to be seen. With the MLB’s automatic protection/compensation for unsigned players within the first 3 rounds, I wouldn’t be shocked if a few prospects flew away.

Potential cost savings could be pushed towards the International Signing period, which begins in early July. Last season the Jays spent $4.18 million during this period, the 6th highest amount in the MLB.

Ratio of Picks

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Within the first 25 rounds (and 30 overall picks), the Jays drafted 3 college pitchers vs 16 high school arms.

Of the remaining 11 positional picks, 4 via college (all four are SS), and 7 from high school.

This breakdown is infinitely more staggering than the overall number of 28 high school selections.

AA’s Version of Modern Warfare

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The writing was on the proverbial wall with the off-season addition of a 7th minor league club, the Bluefield Bluejays (advanced rookie). This pointed towards a heavy high school/international focus, although I didn’t think it would be to this extent.

With the majority of top 30 picks being around or under Canadian drinking age, it will take years (from a production standpoint) for a true grading of the Jays 2011 MLB draft. But when looking at this draft from a philosophical standpoint, AA, Tinnish & crew are delivering on their promise of a long-term vision for sustainable competitiveness in the American League East

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