HGH in Baseball: Who cares?

HGH in Baseball: Who cares?

Andro HGH Baseball 
Here€™s how I see it.

Back during the home run revival, Big Mac came straight out and said that he loved his Andro. At the time, what was the problem? Within the then current rules of Major League Baseball, HGH & other over the counter sports supplements were not banned. So let’s just turn around and interpret it this way, if it’s not banned than it is allowed, right?

Back in those days, this hypothetical example could have taken place, and, if it did, would be perfectly legal within the rule set.

Big Mac is on the way to the park for a 7:05 game. On his way to the park, he says what the hell, let’s go to the mall. While lollygagging about the mall, he decides to roll up to the GNC and buy some M1T, Andro, other HGH and maybe an anti-estrogen pill. Now remember, at this time anyone over the age of 18 could stroll into GNC & buy as much HGH as they pleased. No prescription, no back door dealings, just walking up to the shelve, picking up the bottle and taking it to the register. So Mac has his stuff, pops a couple of pills, and then hits one out in the night game. 100% legal here folks.

Some will prattle on and on €œwhat about the children? The example that these guys set yada yada yada. Are you really going to tell me that you can sit your kid down, look them straight in the face and say well son, it’s allowed, but there could be a few side effects down the road. Probably everyone is doing it¦ This family takes the high road€¦ Sure, you’ll make a few million dollars a year more than the guy stuck in AAA. That’s not the point, it’s not a success or monetary question. It’s a moral question!

Bull. If the competition is, once again, doing everything that is within the rules of the game, to improve themselves, then why shouldn’t you? For that matter, why should a player be chastised for it?

If you see some of the cases coming up now, it’s not a matter of what the players were taking, it was where they were obtaining it from. An illegal internet site here, a crocked doctor there. The Ankiel case is a joke. He ordered a boatload worth of HGH, some of it just before the 2005 deadline. I have news for you folks, these guys take a hell of a lot more than the recommended dosage. If Ankiel ordered 3 months worth in December of 04, you can damn well bet that he finished it off by the deadline of 05. Should this sully his reputation in your eyes? I guess each individual is the judge of that. But the next time you here about a player downing a protein shake or do a bit of exercise, ask yourself if these performance enhancements are any different, as per MLB rulings, than sucking down some HGH prior to 2005? Moral questions aside, the answer is no.

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has written for mopupduty.com since 2006. Follow Matthias on Twitter, Facebook and Google +

  • Early

    Great article, and I cannot disagree with what you have stated. I have had this discussion many time. I liken it to athletes who get preferential medical attention. When Vince Carter would need his weekly MRI he wouldn’t have to wait 6 months like a fan sitting courtside or one in standing room. Should medical attention such as this be considered “immoral” to put it in your words? But, to be the devils advocate, the rules of the sport cannot foresee problems as similar as laws. Murder wasn’t agaisnt the law until it became a problem and was codified. After it is codified those who committed the digression are typically judged if not punished. Even though I do not agree with the backlash that baseball players have been getting for taking previously legal substances, I can understand it.

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